Monthly Archives: November 2012

Integration Testing with MongoDB & Spring Data

Integration Testing is an often overlooked area in enterprise development. This is primarily due to the associated complexities in setting up the necessary infrastructure for an integration test. For applications backed by databases, it’s fairly complicated and time-consuming to setup databases for integration tests, and also to clean those up once test is complete (ex. data files, schemas etc.), to ensure repeatability of tests. While there have been many tools (ex. DBUnit) and mechanisms (ex. rollback after test) to assist in this, the inherent complexity and issues have been there always.

But if you are working with MongoDB, there’s a cool and easy way to do your unit tests, with almost the simplicity of writing a unit test with mocks. With ‘EmbedMongo’, we can easily setup an embedded MongoDB instance for testing, with in-built clean up support once tests are complete. In this article, we will walkthrough an example where EmbedMongo is used with JUnit for integration testing a Repository Implementation.
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STS in OS X – Where’s the sts.ini?

I’ve been using STS (SpringSource Tool Suite) on OS X Lion for sometime now, and today I realized that it’s getting a bit slow. I thought of tuning the heap size a bit to give it more memory, so I went into the installation to look for eclipse.ini, and there was none. So I googled, and found that STS bundles a ‘sts.ini’ file instead. Unfortunately for me, I wasn’t able to find this one in the folder either! Startled, I tried searching on the directory, etc, but it was not there. After googling around a bit more, I found in Spring Forums that the actual sts.ini file for Mac OS comes inside the application bundle. So if you are using Mac OS, and want to edit the sts.ini file, here are the steps.

  1. Go to your STS installation, and right-click on STS Application
  2. Select ‘Show Package Contents’
  3. A new Finder window will open and show the content of the application bundle. Go to ‘Contents’ directory in this window.
  4. Inside ‘Contents’, go to ‘MacOS’ directory

In this folder (Contents/MacOS) you will find the actual executable (STS) and the STS.ini file. Do your changes to STS.ini file (ex.changing Xmx) and save it just like you would under Linux / Windows with eclipse.ini / sts.ini.